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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> bill: okay, now mrs. obama is a lawyer, making her the third first lady to hold the postgraduate degree. who is the first? >> >> bill: the answer is d, hillary clinton. you both got it wrong. hillary clinton got a little master's degree. and then laura bush, do i believe has a librarian thing. masters. both got it wrong. very good start. here is question number two. marilyn monroe, no advanced degree often played a ditsy blonde felt critic for acting skills. though she was nominated for a winner she did win a golden globe for her role in what film? golden globe, marilyn monroe what film? >> terribly sorry. >> sweet sue, you won't tell anybody, will you. >> >> bill: doocy got it right. no surprise there very good film. >> steve: those were men dressed as women. >> bill: really, doocy? >> nothing gets by him. >> they are flamboyant men. >> bill: no end to your dedetective capability. >> bill: i think i have a crick right here. number three. margaret thatcher film. >> we will stand on principle or we will not stand at all. >> but, margaret with all due respect, when one has been to war. >>
or does the gentlelady reserve her time? mrs. davis: i'm sorry, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from california. mr. mckeon: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to thank the gentlelady for her leadership not only on this issue but on the leadership she helps provide to our committee. we have several women serving on the house arm services committee, and they do an outstanding job. over the years, many of us have visited iraq and afghanistan, and i have had that opportunity, but i know that the troops that the women have made bring us back a different perspective. i know the troops that i made, like time before last to afghanistan i went to the south. i went to camp leather neck where they were setting up the marines that just arrived and they were pushing out in the desert. we were not able to visit marja, which was one of the towns in that area. was totally under the control of the taliban. the taliban flag flew over marja. the last time i was there, totally changed. the marines had taken
greatly. they are senator kay bailey hutchison and senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, effic
has the right to own a gun that can kill 20 children in a minute and a half. had mrs. lanza secured her weapons we might not have had so much carnage. keep the conversation going. more of your responses in the next hour of "newsroom." up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ is engineered to amaze. ♪ how advanced is the new ford fusion? well...it has outstanding performance and handling... ...and it offers a plug-in hybrid that gets a projected 100 mpge. of course, there's still one thing it can't do. introducing the entirely new ford fusion. it's an entirely new idea of what a car can be. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications,
. the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, we wish to thank the distinguished manager of the bill for her courtesies and for her skill in managing this bill. her sensitivity to the need for improvements and sustaining the disaster assistance capabilities of our great country. thank you. mr. paul: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kentucky. mr. paul: i ask unanimous consent to call up amendments 3376 and 3410 en bloc. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendments. the clerk: the senator from kentucky, mr. paul, proposes amendment numbered 3376 and 3410 en bloc. mr. paul: mr. president, when hurricane sandy struck, hundreds -- when hurricane sandy struck the northeast, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people were without power. we all saw the video footage, we saw the terrible trauma and people are still trying to dig out from underneath the debris of hurricane sandy. during that period of time, hundreds of workers drove up from the south wanting to help. these workers were nonunionized and they were t
by the senate, he will succeed hillary clinton, as i mentioned. it may end the search to fill mrs. clinton's post after susan rice withdrew her name from consideration earlier this month in the wake of the controversy about what happened and benghazi, libya. we will bring you live to the white house as the news is made. that way you won't miss it. we will see that's really going to be john kerry and the president has to say. in the meantime, we have word that the democrats are calling on republicans to come back to the negotiating table. for more fiscal cliff talks. how speaker john boehner today said the problem is now in the democrats were. >> as you know, the house did not take up the tax bill last night because we didn't have the votes to pass it. it's not the outcome that i wanted. that was the will of the house. was the president and congress take action, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer. devastating defense cuts go into effect attendance. megyn: joining me now is chris stirewalt. post a power play. i watch something interesting last night on hannity last night. he was
and politically savvy. >> madison loved every minute of it. mrs. byrne -- mrs. monroe hated it. >> she warned her husband. you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it with a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and make it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i'm constantly reminded about all of the people who lived there before and particularly, all of the women. >> fi
you, and a lot of people tweeted that they are incredibly moved by it and they were just amazed at mrs. mcdonnell's ability to smile and, you know, remember the good things about her daughter. i mean, how -- you guys are so strong. >> our sister wouldn't want us to be mourning. she would want us celebrating her life. >> celebrate it. uh-huh. >> we said that, even going to the wake. our cousins were saying, should we wear black? and my mom is, no. >> no, she wouldn't want you to wear black. >> no. wear green, wear purple, where what you want. wear a color. wear a color and we did. >> you wear it well. >> thank you. i've worn more green in the last few days than anything. >> there are moments where we are all crying and there are a lot of times that we are able to laugh and smile and still be cheerful with each other and, you know, talk about all of the memories that we have with our sister because there's a lot of them. we're fortunate to have so many. >> we crash and we have our moments and we just lay down and cry and, you know, we hold each other and we, you know, just -- but we have
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
from her as an adult. >> that's probably the first time we've heard from her in a while. >> besides mrs. reagan. but -- >> who couldn't do it. >> but everybody else is in it. >> good for her! i can't wait to see that. >> well, congratulations on your production. congratulations on your future production. >> i had nothing to do with that one. >> i like that prom photo. >> so what's the due date? >> yeah, right. i'm just kidding. >> is that a national security -- >> i'm not going to say the due date but i'm due in the spring. is that close enough? >> hold on a second. did i ask what the due date was? what's the due season? >> the spring. that would have been a nicer way to say it. the due date's coming soon. >> that's reminiscent of some numbers in your family? i heard that tone. >> catch a white house christmas, first families remember, tomorrow on nbc at 8:00 eastern time. meredith, thank you. coming up next, business before the bell with brian sullivan. we're back in a moment. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passio
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
're so fine you blow my mind hey mickey, hey mickey >>> mr. strahan? yes, yes. no, it wasn't me. >> get it fixed! >> i'm going to pass on her cell number. thank you, michael. love you, bro. >> i will take you. i will go with you. >> cheerleading is about more than just wearing a really short skirt and a big smile. you also have to be a good speller. >> actually rob, you might be surprised. >> really? >> cheerleaders these days are pretty amazing athletes and fierce competitors. abc's juju chang has more. >> reporter: it takes flipping out to a whole new level. >> oh! >> if you fall again, i'm going to replace you. >> reporter: tlc's new show, "cheer perfection," brings us inside the rough and tumble world of competitive cheerleading. >> that's the worst basket toss i've ever seen in my life. that was terrible, absolutely terrible. >> reporter: alicia dunlap is head coach and co-owner of cheer time revolution in arkansas. it's her job to make little girls into little champions, no matter what it takes. >> come down. everybody run because of cameron and cassidy. >> reporter: even her own
been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i believed in myself, many, many years ago, a couple decades ago, he said, you know, you're going to do great things in the senate, always talked about my leading the senate, and he always came and said,, oh, always -- you did the right thing by telling you that you did the right thing. the chapter of inouye in the senate is something that is remarkable. not only his military record but what he did with the defense aspec
in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't going to do it. i lost. it was a fair fight, even though he's three times my size. he's a really tough guy. one of the interesting things about him that is unfortunately not practiced frequently in the military or anywhere else, by the way, is that he always led from the front sometimes recklessly, and the mistakes that we all make in combat from time to time and we've all made our share, him included, is that we have a tendency to miscalculate. we go left instead of right. we wait too long and don't wait long enough for ninformation. he m
. they wrote books. >> they are in many cases quite frankly more interesting as human beings than her husband. if only because they are not first and foremost limited by political ambition. >> dolly was both a socially adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. munro hated it. absolutely hated it spent she warned her husband. you know, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute spent during the statement he was a little breathless and it was too much looking that i think goes a little too fast. a change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies, they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i, myself, never made any decision. i only decided what was important, and went to resend it to my husband. >> you stop and think about how much power that is. it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transform the way we look at these bugaboos, and made a possible for countless people to s
. and obviously she is not taking questions about it under oath up on capitol hill today. >> we heard her spokeswoman yesterday basically say, look you're going to hear from mr. nyds and from nicolas burns this morning and they are speaking on behalf of hillary clinton. should that be satisfactory? we understand that hillary clinton is going to testify in january. how different is the climate going to be in january in the middle of the inauguration and everything else, bret? >> right, i think there are senators up there who are concerned about that. they are senator kerry is saying that secretary clinton will testify in january. of course she won't be the secretary of state. and it may very well be senator kerry who is on his way to being secretary of state. we don't know that as of yet. but, remember, there will be a lot of turn over, there will be probably the inauguration underway, there will be nominations and a lot of things happening here that people may get a lot of different focus than benghazi. but, listen, we'll continue to cover it here. there are some information things that t
. i join with the entire senate family in wishing her and john the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, in these closing days of the 112th congress, the senate is saying farewell to again one of our most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has b
-up exam they say was related to her concussion. the state department says clinton suffered that concussion earlier this month. the location of the clot has not yet been disclosed to us. doctors are closely monitoring mrs. clinton. cnn's jill dougherty is live in our washington bureau. jill, you and i have been talking closely this morning, but have you learned any more about her condition or anything from her doctors? >> reporter: no, we've been asking, but so far no updates. the state department had a statement sunday night. we're hoping we'll get something new. at this point, it would appear they're really just watching very carefully to see how those anti- anti-coagulants, what kind of effect they have on her. it's been a rough couple of weeks, first the flu, and then the concussion, and now this. it's especially worrisome when you have a secretary of state who's traveled now almost 1 million miles by air, and they've put that on hold, any type of travel on hold for at least another couple of weeks. right now i can't imagine that she is going to be doing much of anything travel-wise. th
and worked as a photojournalist. she is here with her husband and she follows her father to the chautauqua stage. he spoke here when he was minority leader of the u.s. house of representatives. lynda johnson robb is the first child of lyndon johnson and lady bird johnson. [laughter] mrs. robb has served for 44 years and is now chairman emeritus. she was appointed by president jimmy carter to serve as chair of the president's advisory committee for women. she put her own career, including as a contributing editor @ "ladies' home journal" on hold to work with her husband on his successful virginia and the minute choral candidacy. as virginia's first lady, she launched and chaired the grid kenya district -- the virginia history project. she is here with her husband who has always been here before and her daughter and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the a
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
susan rice took her name out, every day we would see kerry in the subway that runs underneath here or the elevator saying, hi, mr. secretary, congratulations. he would say not yet, not yet. so he's kind of been in an odd waiting game, waiting for the official news, and even this morning my understanding is his senate office didn't know officially this was going to come today. so there definitely has been -- there's a feeling this is a long time coming for senator kerry, and that's why for a number of reasons it's pretty clear that he's going to be confirmed. >> he canning loud and proud now. dana bash reporting live from capitol hill. thanks so much. >>> also happening now in washington, lawmakers are saying good-bye to hawaii senator daniel inouye. there's a special memorial service. the senate chaplain will deliver a sermon and you see president obama wiping tears from his eyes. he was the second longest serving senator in history. he served hawaii since 1959. that's where president obama grew up so he's well familiar with daniel inouye. he was awarded medal of honor after losing
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)